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Pet Bucket Blog

Is It Safe to use Tea Tree Oil as treatment against Fleas?

 by james on 21 Oct 2022 |
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Is It Safe to use Tea Tree Oil as treatment against Fleas?

Our pets suffer from itching and discomfort from fleas, but they can be simply avoided. Chewable tablets, topical treatments, and collars are all flea prevention options for pets. Some of these preventatives last up to 12 weeks these days.

Natural topical flea treatments, including tea tree oil, are a preferred choice for some pet owners. However, if consumed or applied incorrectly, tea tree oil can be poisonous to animals. Your veterinarian can assist you in making the best choice for both you and your pet.

Is it safe to use tea tree oil as a topical flea treatment?

For both safety and effectiveness concerns, it is typically not advised to use home cures for fleas. Your veterinarian offers flea remedies that have been put through rigorous safety testing. They have also been shown to be successful in preventing and eliminating fleas. Tea tree, eucalyptus, and citronella essential oils and extracts don't need to be tested for safety or efficacy, and the bottle's contents aren't even regulated. That implies that there is no guarantee that you will receive what you paid for.

But does tea tree oil also work as a flea deterrent?

Fleas can be killed and repelled by tea tree oil when used properly and diluted. But the Merck Veterinary Manual lists it as one of the herbal remedies that are "particularly dangerous." This is due to the fact that tea tree oil is challenging to appropriately dilute in household kitchens.

Only 0.1 to 1% of tea tree oil is used in commercially available pet formulations. It is simple to apply more than you planned to, even if you measure everything carefully and shake the bottle before spraying it on your dog's coat. Pets often lick the oil off while they brush themselves, which might make your cat or dog very ill.

Very small levels of tea tree oil are present in shampoos that may be purchased at stores. The oil is dispersed evenly throughout the product, lowering the danger of toxicity for pets.
 
 
Aren’t topical flea products more toxic than tea tree oil?

The majority of topical flea treatments that veterinarians advise using target chemicals that are unique to insects and not present in mammals. They are effective at killing fleas swiftly in the little quantities that are applied to skin or consumed because of this, making them safe to use on our pets.

Another group of substances are poisonous to some mammals but not to others. For instance, a class of chemicals known as permethrins is present in various tick products and is acceptable for use on dogs but harmful for cats. Tea tree oil fits into this category because it can be poisonous to our dogs and fleas despite being probably safe for the majority of people when applied topically. The dosage necessary to eradicate all fleas could be lethal to your cat.

The fact that certain commercially available flea treatments contain chemicals that really halt the development of the fleas' offspring makes them preferable to essential oils like tea tree. Therefore, any eggs that a female may lay prior to being destroyed by the flea treatment will not be able to develop. No eggs, no adults, no fleas.

What safer alternatives exist for flea repulsion?

Diatomaceous earth is a natural treatment that might be less dangerous than tea tree oil. The name given to preserved algae is lengthy. Cockroaches, snails, fleas, and even some types of worms are among the insects that it works by making holes in. Diatomaceous earth is frequently offered to horses and livestock to help treat intestinal worms. It has long been used around vegetable plants to keep bugs out. It is far safer to use on your pet than something like tea tree oil, which is poisonous when consumed even in small quantities (contact a veterinarian or physician), because it is safe to take in precise proportions (consult a veterinarian or physician).

Please talk to your veterinarian before using a home remedy, such as diluted tea tree oil. Your doctor can assist you in making the greatest decision for your family because they are knowledgeable about science as well as your pet and lifestyle.

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