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How to treat hot spots

 by yunus on 01 Nov 2018 |
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Hot spots aren’t just painful for your pet, but can also be stressful to treat.  These tips may help you.

Hot spots aren’t just painful for your pet, but can also be stressful to treat. Whether they’re caused by a flea allergy or emotional distress, it’s important to get to the root of the problem so you can stop it at its source.
 
Hot spots are an immune response that causes parts of your dog’s skin to overproduce natural bacteria, producing red, irritated or even oozing lesions. While any pet can develop the painful condition, hot spots are most common in breeds with thick coats, pets with poor grooming and those suffering from all types of allergies. Left untreated, they can spread fast, so it’s important to address the problem as soon as you notice your pet is suffering from these irritations.
 
Treating the wound should be first on your list of priorities after you notice your pet is suffering from hot spots. Begin by carefully removing the hair in and around the infected area, and then disinfect the spot with diluted povidone-iodine or another antiseptic. Continue cleaning the wound as often as needed to keep it clean, dry, and pus-free—at least twice daily in the early stages of treatment. Because hot spots can spread quickly and cause fever or serious skin conditions, take your pet to the vet if his sores continue to grow after several days of at-home treatment. Be sure to prevent your companion from licking or chewing the infected area by covering it or outfitting him with an e-collar.
 
Once you’ve cleaned your pet’s hot spots, watch him closely to determine what’s causing the problem. Insect bites, including from fleas, can cause irritation, as can allergic reactions to everything from food to pollen, grass, or mold. Hot spots can also arise from emotional stress, such as separation anxiety, changes in living situation or even boredom. Pay attention to what seems to trigger your dog’s condition. Note any changes in his environment, such as moving house or introducing a new pet to the home, that could be causing your dog stress and if you suspect his hot spots are due to emotional upset, work to minimize upheaval from these changes. Some dogs experience hot spots as a reaction to flea bites, so groom your pet with a flea comb regularly and ensure his flea treatments are up-to-date. A good grooming routine can also help ensure your dog doesn’t suffer from hot spots. Though less common, underlying conditions, such as sciatica, can cause pets to chew on their skin above the painful spot, too.
 

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Jean Givens
Jean Givens
United States, Lexington
14 Nov 2018
I have used Revolution in the past and been happy with it. I decided to foster two cats for a few months, and switched to an inex ... more
 
 
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