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What is Credelio for Dogs?

Credelio (lotilaner) is a beef-flavored, monthly chewable tablet which kills adult fleas and is indicated for the treatment of flea infestations (Ctenocephalides felis) and the treatment and control of tick infestations such as:

  • Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick)
  • Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick)
  • Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick)
  • Rhipicephalus sanguineus (brown dog tick)

Manufactured by Elanco, Credelio comes in 4 different sizes: 4.4 to 6.0 lbs, 6.1 to 12.0 lbs, 12.1 to 25.0 lbs, 25.1 to 50.0 lbs.

Who are Credelio chewable tablets for?

For dogs and puppies (8 weeks of age).

Will my fido eat it?

It is beef-flavored and thus irresistible to dogs :-)

Dosage Schedule

Body Weight Lotilaner Per Chewable Tablet (mg) Chewable Tablets Administered
4.4 to 6.0 lbs (1.3-2.5kg) 56.25 One
6.1 to 12.0 lbs (2.5-5kg) 112.5 One
12.1 to 25.0 lbs (5.5-11kg) 225 One
25.1 to 50.0 lbs (11-22 kg) 450 One
50.1 to 100.0 lbs (22-45 kg) 900 One
Over 100.0 lbs Administer the appropriate combination of chewable tablets

Credelio must be given with food or given within 30 minutes after feeding.

What are the side effects?

Some possible side effects are weight loss, elevated blood urea nitrogen (BUN), polyuria or diarrhea.

What special precautions are there?

  • Keep away from children and animals.
  • Not for human use.
  • Do not use it on cats.
  • The safe use of Credelio in breeding, pregnant or lactating dogs hasn't been evaluated.
  • Use with caution in dogs with a history of seizures.

How can I get the rebates?

Since we get our stock from third-party suppliers, it is not possible to get any rebates.

How effective is Credelio (lotilaner)?

In well-controlled European laboratory studies, Credelio began to kill fleas four hours after administration or infestation, with greater than 99% of fleas killed within eight hours after administration or infestation for 35 days. In a well-controlled U.S. laboratory study, Credelio demonstrated 100% effectiveness against adult fleas 12 hours after administration or infestation for 35 days.

In a 90-day well-controlled U.S. field study conducted in households with existing flea infestations of varying severity, the effectiveness of Credelio against fleas on Days 30, 60 and 90 compared to baseline was 99.5%,100%, and 100%, respectively. Dogs with signs of flea allergy dermatitis showed improvement in erythema, papules, scaling, alopecia, dermatitis/pyodermatitis and pruritus as a direct result of eliminating fleas.

In well-controlled laboratory studies, Credelio demonstrated > 97% effectiveness against Amblyomma americanum, Dermacentor variabilis, Ixodes scapularis and Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks 48 hours after administration or infestation for 30 days. In a well-controlled European laboratory study, Credelio started killing Ixodes ricinus ticks within four hours after administration.

Palatability: In the U.S. field study, which included 567 doses administered to 198 dogs, 80.4% of dogs voluntarily consumed Credelio when offered by hand or in an empty bowl, an additional 13.6% consumed Credelio when offered with food, and 6.0% required placement of the chewable tablet in the back of the dog’s mouth.

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